Pages

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Chips or meat? Rice or lollies? The foods that are safe to eat under the five-second rule... or is it all just a cooked-up claim?

One of the most widespread 'food rules' passed down from generation to generation may actually be a myth, meaning this tart isn't safe to pick up
One of the most widespread 'food rules' passed down from generation to generation may actually be a myth.
The five-second rule, which has been cited to justify picking up everything from a salt and vinegar chip to an assortment of cold cuts, is not as sure-fire as many snackers would surely like it to be.
Experts have largely dismissed the almost magical powers surrounding the five-second rule, but said what type of food and where you drop it does come into play.

'There's no such things as a 'five-second rule',' Food Safety Information Council spokeswoman Rachelle Williams told Daily Mail Australia.
'It's a myth; we definitely do not recommend it.'

However, Ms Williams said we need to consider the type of food before picking something up off the floor and eating it.
'It all comes down to bacteria,' she said.

 'Bacteria relies on moisture to grow, so any food wet food is considering potentially hazardous. It's much easier for bacteria to grow on those foods.
'With dry foods, it is conversely much tougher for bacteria to grow.'
Dry foods are things such as potato chips, lollies, nuts, biscuits, crackers and uncooked rice or pasta.

 Dry foods are things such as potato chips, lollies, nuts, biscuits, crackers and uncooked rice or pasta.
Wet foods are cut fruit, cold meats, ham, salami, dairy products, and cooked rice or pasta.
The comments come after the Food Safety Information Council released a food safety report card as part of World Health Day on April 7.

 More than 4.1 million cases of food poisoning are diagnosed in Australia every year, with 31,920 hospitalisations and 82 deaths. However, the number is coming down, which experts credited to an increased basic understanding of food safety.
‘Australian consumers get an A plus for knowledge...', Food Safety Information Council Chair Professor Michael Eyles said.
‘But there are a number of other food safety practices where there can be ‘room for improvement.'
Mr Eyles identified cooking food thoroughly, being aware of and sticking to use-by dates, and ensuring it is stored at the right temperature as important areas of focus.