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Thursday, March 28, 2019

Beggar with a flat and designer wardrobe reveals how he dupes unsuspecting shoppers into giving him money by ditching his flashy clothes and dressing 'trampish'

A beggar has revealed he dupes unsuspecting passersby into giving him money by ditching his designer clothes and dressing 'trampish'.
The man, known only as Deryck, usually wears £200 boots and a £250 jacket and has his own flat in Glasgow.
He made the shock admission in a TV documentary during an interview with ex-soldier Ed Stafford, who spent 60 days on the streets investigating homelessness.
Mr Stafford previously told how one homeless man in Glasgow complained the public 'overfeed' him.
Ed Stafford (pictured), a former captain in the British army, lived on the streets for two months for the documentary. He met a homeless man named only as Deryck
Ed Stafford (pictured), a former captain in the British army, lived on the streets for two months for the documentary. He met a homeless man named only as Deryck
In the programme, Mr Stafford first encountered Deryck at his begging spot near the city's busy Royal Exchange Square. 
Deryck told the presenter that Glasgow is dangerous for the homeless and that he has been stabbed and robbed.
Two days later, the pair met up in a cafe away from Deryck's usual pitch and former Army captain Mr Stafford, 43, could not believe how smartly dressed he was.
Mr Stafford, an explorer who became the first person to walk the length of the Amazon, barely recognised him.
Deryck, who claims to be battling an addiction to so-called street valium, confessed that he had a flat.
The beggar boasted: 'I dress down for the day to come in to make money. Today I'm not doing that so I just dress normal – as I normally would.
'People don't give you money when you are dressed in expensive clothing – £200 boots, £250 jacket and £100 jeans. They just don't do it.
The former army captain has done several other survival series including 'Walking the Amazon'
'It's hard enough to get money off people as it is.
'You come in and dress down or 'trampish' as I would call it.' 
A bemused Mr Stafford told him he thought he was sleeping rough.
Deryck said he has had a 'wee flat for six, seven months, maybe longer'.
Last night, politicians said the revelation could stop people giving money to those really in need.
Conservative MSP Annie Wells said: 'The majority of homelessness cases in Glasgow are genuine, but this example only harms the cause.
'There's clearly no real reason why this individual, with the benefit of having accommodation, can't get a normal job. Instead, it seems he wants to trick the kind-hearted people of Glasgow into parting with their well-earned cash.'
He spent two months living on the streets for the documentary and spoke to beggars who make as much as £600 per day
He spent two months living on the streets for the documentary and spoke to beggars who make as much as £600 per day 
Mr Stafford, 43, slept rough in London, Manchester and Glasgow for the documentary series, called 60 Days on the Streets.
Tonight's show charts how Scottish authorities are making more inroads into tackling rough sleeping than those in England.
Only 30 homeless people are estimated to brave Glasgow's streets every night, according to the documentary, compared with more than 1,000 in London.
Previous episodes of 60 Days on the Streets showed how fake rough sleepers in London made up to £600 a day begging.
Mr Stafford said he gained 11lb because passers-by kept giving him food and that he could also make up to £200 a night. 
He said: 'I think I was shocked by the amount of food that was available.
'I thought I was going to lose loads of weight and it was going to be harder to physically survive – but in fact there was an abundance of people wanting to help, in all three cities. 
'In Glasgow... I even met one homeless man who complained the public 'overfeed' him.'

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